Stories About: sd-wan

What to consider before hitting the SD-WAN open road

What to consider before hitting the SD-WAN open road

By Richard Arneson Estimates vary (greatly), but industry analysts predict the SD-WAN market will clock in somewhere between $4.5 billion and $9 billion by 2022. Yes, that’s quite a variance, but whether it finishes at the high or low end, the growth is staggering considering it’s now just shy of $1 billion. Yeah, it’s big,…

When implementing a new technology, don’t forget this word

When implementing a new technology, don’t forget this word

By Richard Arneson “Change is the only constant.” — Heraclitus, Greek philosopher   Change—it’s a word that’s dreaded by many, feared by most and embraced by few. But even if you fall into the latter, you can’t deny there’s at least some level of trepidation prior to entering the world of the unknown. Change can be…

How does IoT fit with SD-WAN?

How does IoT fit with SD-WAN?

By Richard Arneson Now that computing has been truly pushed out to the edge, it brings up questions about how it will mesh with today’s networks. The answer? Very well, especially regarding SD-WAN. IoT is comprised of three types of devices that make it work―sensors, gateways and the Cloud. No, smart phones aren’t one of…

SD-WAN: Demystifying Overlay, Underlay, Encapsulation & Network Virtualization

SD-WAN: Demystifying Overlay, Underlay, Encapsulation & Network Virtualization

Following will be more details on the subject, but let’s just get this out of the way first: SD-WAN is a virtual, or overlay, network; the physical, or underlay, network is the one on which the overlay network resides. Virtual overlay networks contain nodes and links (virtual ones, of course) and allow new services to…

Dispelling myths about SD-WAN

Dispelling myths about SD-WAN

Many of the misrepresentations of truth (OK, myths) that get bandied about regarding SD-WAN come from MPLS providers or network engineers who are happy with their current architecture and/or dread the thought of change. There’s no question, MPLS has been a great transport technology over the past fifteen (15) years or so, and its removal…

Flexible deployment to match unique architectural needs

Flexible deployment to match unique architectural needs

In late 2017, tech giant VMware purchased VeloCloud, which further strengthened and enhanced its market-leading position transitioning enterprises to a more software-defined future. The acquisition greatly built on the success of its leading VMware NSX virtualization platform, and expanded its portfolio to address branch transformation, security, end-to-end automation and application continuity from the data center…

The Plane Truth about SD-WAN

The Plane Truth about SD-WAN

You can’t get more than a few words into any article, blog or brochure about SD-WAN without reading how the control and data planes are separated. For many, this might fall under the As long as it works, I don’t really care about it heading. And that’s evident based on a lot of the writing…

Cisco’s Power of v

Cisco’s Power of v

In April of 2017, Cisco put both feet into the SD-WAN waters with their purchase of San Jose, Ca.-based Viptela, a privately held SD-WAN company. One of the biggest reasons for the acquisition was its ability to easily integrate Viptela software into Cisco’s platforms. Prior to the acquisition, Cisco’s SD-WAN solution utilized its own IWAN…

SDN and SD-WAN: A Father & Son Story

SDN and SD-WAN: A Father & Son Story

By Richard Arneson SD-WAN (software-defined WAN) has been all the rage for a few years now, coming to the rescue of enterprises that had spent considerable chunks of their IT budgets on MPLS to connect offices scattered through the world. But it’s not to be confused with SDN (software-defined networking), which, even though they both…

How SD-WAN can enhance application performance

How SD-WAN can enhance application performance

By Richard Arneson Remember the days when a new software application meant downloads, licenses, and minimum RAM and processing power requirements? Or when applications resided in a corporate data center and were accessed over expensive, leased lines from service providers, only then to be handed off to the Internet? Expensive, inefficient, and prone to latency―not…