Unwrapping DevOps

By Richard Arneson

As the name suggests, is the shortened combination of two (2) words―development and operations. Originally, application development was time-consuming, fraught with errors and bugs, and, ultimately, resulted in the bane of the business world―slow to market.

Prior to DevOps, which addresses that slow to market issue, application developers worked in sequestered silos. They would collaborate with operations at a minimum, if at all. They’d gather requirements from operations, write huge chunks of code, then deliver their results weeks, maybe months, later.

They primary issue that can sabotage any relationship, whether personal or professional―is a lack of communication. Now sprinkle collaboration into the mix, and you have DevOps. It broke down communication and collaboration walls that still exist – if DevOps isn’t being utilized – between the two (2). The result? Faster time to market.

Off-Shoot of

DevOps, which has been around for approximately ten (10) years, was borne out of Agile Development, created roughly ten (10) years prior to that. Agile Development is, simply, an approach to software development. Agile, as the name suggests, delivers the final project with more speed, or agility. It breaks down software development into smaller, more manageable chunks, and solicits feedback throughout the development process. As a result, application development became far more flexible and capable of responding to needs and changes much faster.

While many use Agile and DevOps interchangeably, they’re not the same

While Agile provides tremendous benefits as it relates to software development, it stops short of what DevOps provides. While DevOps can certainly utilize Agile methodologies, it doesn’t drop off the finished product, then quickly move on to the next one. Agile is a little like getting a custom-made device that solves some type of problem; DevOps will make the device, as well, but will also install it in the safest and most effective manner. In short, Agile is about developing applications―DevOps both develops and deploys it.

How does DevOps address Time to Market?

Prior to DevOps and Agile, application developers would deliver their release to operations, which would be responsible for testing the resultant software. And when testing isn’t conducted throughout the development process, operations is left with a very large application, often littered with issues and errors. Hundreds of thousands of lines of code that access multiple databases, networks and interfaces can require a tremendous amount of man hours to test, which in turn takes those man hours off other pressing projects―inefficient, wasteful. And often there was no single person or entity responsible for overseeing the entire project, and each department may have different success metrics. Going back to the relationship analogy, poor communication and collaboration means frustration and dissatisfaction for all parties involved. And with troubled relationships comes finger-pointing.

Automation

One of key elements of DevOps is its use of automation, which helps to deliver faster, more reliable deployments. Through the use of automation testing tools currently available, like Selenium, Test Studio and TestNG, to name a few, test cases can be constructed, then run while the application is being built. This reduces testing times exponentially and helps ensure each of the processes and features have been developed error free.

Automation is utilized for more than just testing, however. Workflows in development and deployment can be automated, enhancing collaboration and communication and, of course, shortening the delivery process. Production-ready environments that have already been tested can be continuously delivered. Real-time reporting can provide a window into any changes, or defects, that have taken place. And automated processes mean fewer mistakes due to human error.

Questions about what DevOps can deliver to your organization?

While DevOps isn’t a product, it’s certainly an integral component to consider when evaluating a Managed Services Provider (MSP). GDT’s DevOps professionals have time and again helped to provide and deploy customer solutions that have helped shorten their time to market and more rapidly enjoy positive business outcomes. For more information about DevOps and the many benefits it can provide to organizations of all sizes, contact GDT’s talented, tenured solutions architects at SolutionsArchitects@gdt.com. They’d love to hear from you.